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Rare form of Argyle, 1798

Availability: In stock

£1,395.00
Argyle - London 1798 by John Emes - 22cm long x 15cm high; 750ml; 507g - CY/5837

Rare form of Argyle, 1798







Details

Argyles come in many forms and are clever pots for delivering warm gravy (or sauce) to the table. They are so called because their use was first promoted by the 5th Duke of Argyle. The story goes, that John Campbell, the fifth Duke of Argyll, and his wife Elizabeth Gunning, Baroness Hamilton of Hameldon, disliked the cold gravy that arrived at their table from the kitchens of Inverary Castle. So through several adaptations, where hot water lay next to the gravy in a variety of ingenious methods to maintain its temperature prior to use, the double-skinned Argyle was born. They were very difficult to manufacture and so were expensive to buy - few therefore were made and even less survive. This Georgian silver argyle (or argyll) is in a rarely found form with a false base to the gravy compartment under which the hot water lies. The water enters via a downpipe (with hinged cap) at the handle end of the vessel and the displaced air can exit via a small pipe to the side. This argyle has a wooden handle to protect the user from the heat and a removable cover with silver finial. The side of the body and the cover are both engraved with a matching crest. The condition of this ingenious argyle is generally very good, however there are a number of small dents around the lower part of the body.
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