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Georgian Argyle, 1800

Availability: In stock

£1,650.00
Argyle - Vase-shaped with Central Water Cylinder - London 1800 by John Emes - 20cm high; approx. 15cm long (handle to spout tip); 363g gross weight - WE/8617

Georgian Argyle, 1800








Details

The "Argyle" was purportedly invented in the third quarter of the 18th century by John, 4th Duke of Argyll who disliked cold gravy and devised a hollow hot water jacket to counteract this anomaly. Argyles take a wide range of forms and this particular example has a removable central cylinder to the interior that can be filled with boiling hot water to keep the gravy warm and its wooden handle protects the user from heat.

 

John Emes (& later Emes & Barnard) were the most prolific producers of this type of vessel and they were patronised by many aristocrats and nobleman with sympathies for the issues suffered by the 4th Duke, and appropriately this Georgian period argyle is engraved with a conforming crest to the body and removable cover. The condition of this novel gravy pot is excellent throughout.

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